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  • Winning the Peace: An American Strategy for Post-Conflict Reconstruction (CSIS Significant Issues, No. 26) (Csis Significant Issues Series)
    Winning the Peace: An American Strategy for Post-Conflict Reconstruction (CSIS Significant Issues, No. 26) (Csis Significant Issues Series)
    by Robert C. Orr
  • Fixing Failed States: A Framework for Rebuilding a Fractured World
    Fixing Failed States: A Framework for Rebuilding a Fractured World
    by Ashraf Ghani, Clare Lockhart
  • The Utility of Force: The Art of War in the Modern World (Vintage)
    The Utility of Force: The Art of War in the Modern World (Vintage)
    by Rupert Smith
  • Brave New War: The Next Stage of Terrorism and the End of Globalization
    Brave New War: The Next Stage of Terrorism and the End of Globalization
    by John Robb
  • Wars, Guns, and Votes: Democracy in Dangerous Places
    Wars, Guns, and Votes: Democracy in Dangerous Places
    by Paul Collier
  • The Pentagon's New Map: War and Peace in the Twenty-first Century
    The Pentagon's New Map: War and Peace in the Twenty-first Century
    by Thomas P.M. Barnett
  • State-Building: Governance and World Order in the 21st Century
    State-Building: Governance and World Order in the 21st Century
    by Francis Fukuyama
  • When States Fail: Causes and Consequences
    When States Fail: Causes and Consequences
    Princeton University Press
  • Building States to Build Peace
    Building States to Build Peace
    Lynne Rienner Publishers
  • Making States Work: State Failure And The Crisis Of Governance
    Making States Work: State Failure And The Crisis Of Governance
    United Nations University Press
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Entries in Reports (1)

Monday
Jan252010

Afghanistan and Pakistan Regional Stabilization Strategy

The Office of the Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan (Holbrooke) just released its regional stabilization strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan.


According to Secretary of State Clinton:


The challenges in both countries are immense. The Afghan government is under assault from the Taliban and struggling to provide security, jobs, and basic justice to a society devastated by 30 years of war. Across the border, the Pakistani people are victim to regular suicide bombings despite their military’s increasingly determined efforts against extremist elements. And while al-Qaeda’s safe-haven in the Afghanistan-Pakistan border area is increasingly disrupted, its senior leaders are still planning attacks against our homeland and our Allies.

 

We shaped our political, economic, and diplomatic efforts in Afghanistan and Pakistan with these realities in mind. Far from an exercise in "nation-building," the programs detailed here aim to achieve realistic progress in critical areas. They are aligned with our security objectives and have been developed in close consultation with the Afghan and Pakistani governments, as well as our international partners. When combined with U.S. combat operations and efforts to build Afghan and Pakistani security capacity, these programs constitute an innovative, whole-of-government strategy to protect our vital interests in this volatile region of the world.


Here's a summary of the reports key initiatives for Afghanistan:


  • Increasing significantly the number of civilian technical advisers in key central government ministries and in the provinces and district centers to help make Afghan government institutions more visible, effective, and accountable. Additional ministries and Afghan institutions will be certified to receive direct U.S. assistance, enhancing ministerial capacity, improving the effectiveness of our assistance, and decreasing reliance on contractors.


  • Implementing a new civilian-military agriculture redevelopment strategy that will sap the insurgency not only of foot soldiers, but also of income from the narcotics trade.

 

  • Expanding sub-national capacity building efforts, focused mainly in key population centers in the East and South, through new civ-mil initiatives, such as the District Development Working Groups and District Support Teams, and supporting programs that give Afghans a greater stake in their own government, such as the National Solidarity Program. A key emphasis will be assisting Afghan efforts to reduce corruption.

 

  • Creating space for traditional dispute resolution mechanisms to re-emerge in areas cleared of the Taliban, while also strengthening the formal justice system.

 

  • Reducing the drug trade by interdicting drug traffickers and disrupting their networks, instead of targeting poor Afghan farmers through eradication.

 

  • Supporting Afghan government efforts to re-integrate Taliban who renounce al-Qaeda, cease violence, and accept the constitutional system.

 

  • Redoubling international efforts to target illicit financial flows to the Taliban.

 

  • Countering al-Qaeda and Taliban propaganda, while also empowering Afghans to challenge the insurgents’ narrative by improving access to mobile phones, radio, and television.

 

  • Improving coordination of international assistance. We are consulting with Allies and partners to strengthen the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA), and to enhance civilian coordination among ISAF partners.


You can download the entire thing here.